Upcoming Workshop: “Moving with Intention: Consent and Gender in Yoga” at the Accessible Yoga Conference, Toronto.

TorontoAYC
The Accessible Yoga Conference Toronto 2018 is here!
Looking forward to all the presentations from Accessible Yoga Canada including the World’s Largest Accessible Yoga Class on Saturday at 12:00. My workshop “Moving with Intention: Consent and Gender in Yoga” will be held on Sunday June 24th from 1:30 – 3:00. This workshop will help yoga teachers think critically about touch and adjustments in studio spaces, how gender informs experiences of touch, and how to facilitate trauma-informed consent culture as normalized part of yoga practice.
Thank you Jivana Heyman for all your hard work in manifesting this important space.
If you would like to register, visit the conference website http://www.accessibleyoga.org
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Upcoming presentation: “Transgender Chimeras and the Politics of Listening” at the Trans Matters conference, Toronto

TransMatters-logo-300x300I am looking forward to the upcoming Trans Matters Conference, organized by the Centre for Feminist Research at York University. I will be presenting tomorrow, June 21st at 4:10 on the panel “Critiquing Clinical Care, Centering Trans Experience” giving a paper from my dissertation titled “Transgender Chimeras and the Politics of Listening.” You can also catch me chairing the panel “Trans-national, Trans-(g)local” at 2:30 on June 21st.
 
The keynotes are free and open to the public including Jin Haritaworn “Marvelous Grounds on Friday, and Gwen Benaway, “Holy Wild” on Saturday
 
 

Yoga International features info about my upcoming workshop on consent and gender

For those of you following my yoga equity work, I have been featured in an article on Yoga International about the Accessible Yoga Conference coming to Toronto June 22 – 24. Thank you Kathleen Kraft for this piece. Check it out:

The Accessible Yoga Conference in Toronto: What You Need to Know

“At the Toronto conference, classes will be offered in inclusive chair yoga, yoga for large bodies, pranayama for diverse populations, feminist yoga and the ethics of care, developmental movement, yoga for underserved seniors, living and teaching yoga with mental health challenges, best practices in therapeutic yoga, yoga for the special child, working with cancer patients, yoga for stress-related illnesses, yoga service and social justice, yoga for PTSD, building a sustainable practice, and consent and gender in yoga.

One of the presenters, Tobias Wiggins, will be covering the “hot” topic of consent in yoga. ‘The topic of consent has risen to the forefront in mainstream media of late, but what larger dialogues sometimes overlook is how consent (or the lack of it) is a part of the subtle fabric of everyday life,’ Wiggins says. ‘In yoga class, this often manifests in adjustments or touch without established consent, a dynamic that is compounded further by the gender identity of students and instructors. I love that the AYC is taking steps to expand [the conversation] about accessibility to [also address] social issues—like race, gender, class, and sexuality—these are topics that have a huge impact on our yoga practice and overall health.'”

read the full article 

Everyday Racism and White Allyship workshop for Campus Chaplains Gathering, May 15th

I’m excited to announce that on May 15th, I will be giving a workshop on Everyday Racism and White Allyship for the Ecumenical Campus Chaplains Gathering. The event will be held May 14-17 at Five Oaks Education and Retreat Centre. 

I provide workshops on racism and white allyship through my social justice consultation.

If you are interested in having me come teach or give a talk, please be in touch.

RACISM AND WHITE ALLYSHIP

This workshop will provide a robust introduction to topics of racism and white privilege, primarily in their more subtle and institutionalized forms. We explore key terminology, including the normalization of racism, intersectionality, and the invisibilization of white privilege. Together, we will work towards a better understanding of the “everydayness” of racism.  This session provides key tools for deconstructing individual and institutional privilege, as well as strategies for effective allyship.

Photos and closing remarks from the Summer Institute for Sexuality Studies

 

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Introducing Dr Aparna Mishra Tarc

The Summer Institute for Sexuality Studies was a project three years in the making, spearheaded by myself and another graduate student at York University. We came to the idea after attending a summer institute in Europe, and wanting to bring something similar that focused on interdiciplianry, intersectional conversations around a single scholarly topic. “Perversion” was our primary query, and we chose three locations that were not often in conversation as our lense: critical race theory, psychoanalysis, and queer theory.  Our invited lecturers – David Eng, Trish Salah, Amber Jamilla Musser, and Aparna Mishra Tarc –  gave incredible talks and master classes. The students selected for the institute were very engaged and their scholarship was compelling. Many connections were made, many new ideas inspired. Thank you to everyone who contributed to making this a success, espcially Daria Davydova, Alison Crosby, Allyson Mitchell, Ena Dua, and Julia Pyryeskina.

 

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SISS Lecture, “Race as Relation” with Dr. David L. Eng

SISS Eng lecture poster
The Centre for Feminist Research at York University presents:
Summer Institute in Sexuality Studies (SISS) 2017 
Perversion at the Crossroads of Critical Race Studies, Psychoanalysis, and Queer Theory
 
Race as Relation
Public Lecture by Dr. David L. Eng
Introduced by Dr. David Murray
Thursday, June 8th
10am-11.30am
519 Kaneff, York University
Race is not a “thing” as it is commonly understood—an unchanging biological trait, a bodily attribute, a difference of blood quantum or color, a static identity. Rather, race is a relation—a continuous, modulating relationship among subjects mediating processes of social inclusion and exclusion.
This talk investigates “race as relation” in law and psychoanalysis. It begins with the idea of race as it emerged from the Transatlantic slave trade and the objectification of the slave as property. How did property, as a relationship and a set of rights and privileges, shape histories of racial inclusion and exclusion in U.S. law and society? In turn, how do psychoanalytic theories on subject-object relations rework fundamental assumptions about race and property? Finally, how do histories of race challenge ideas of the universal subject in psychoanalysis?
Dr. David L. Eng is Richard L. Fisher Professor and Graduate Chair in the Department of English at the University of Pennsylvania. Eng is author of The Feeling of Kinship: Queer Liberalism and the Racialization of Intimacy (Duke, 2010) and Racial Castration: Managing Masculinity in Asian America (Duke, 2001). His forthcoming book Reparations and the Human investigates the relationship between political and psychic genealogies of reparation in Cold War Asia.
Interested in attending? 
This lecture is free, but please RSVP to confirm your attendance via EventBrite ( https://www.eventbrite.ca/myevent?eid=33894893539 )
For more information, please visit siss.info.yorku.ca
For the full list of SISS events open to the public, please visit siss.info.yorku.ca/public-events/ (or see the attached poster)
Follow us on Twitter @SISS2017
See the event on Facebook
With support from a SSHRC Connection Grant and York University: Office of the Vice President Academic & Provost; Office of the Vice President Research and Innovation; the Faculty of Education; the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies; the Faculty of Graduate Studies; the Graduate Program in Gender, Feminist and Women’s Studies; the School of Gender, Sexuality and Women’s Studies; Glendon Gender and Women’s Studies Program; the Sexuality Studies Program; Institute for Feminist Legal Studies at Osgoode Hall Law School; Graduate Program in Social and Political Thought; Department of Anthropology; Department of History; Department of Political Science; Department of Social Science; and the Centre for Feminist Research.
Public transit directions to York University are here – http://maps.info.yorku.ca/keele-campus/keele-transit-directions/
The York Keele campus map is here – http://maps.info.yorku.ca/keele-campus/

SISS Lecture, “Carrie Mae Weems and the Question of Brown Jouissance” with Dr. Amber Jamilla Musser

SISS Musser lecture poster
The Centre for Feminist Research at York University presents:
Summer Institute in Sexuality Studies (SISS) 2017 
Perversion at the Crossroads of Critical Race Studies, Psychoanalysis, and Queer Theory
 
Carrie Mae Weems and the Question of Brown Jouissance
Public Lecture by Dr. Amber Jamilla Musser
Introduced by Dr. Sheila Cavanagh
Wednesday, June 7, 2017
12.30-2.00pm
519 Kaneff, York University
Carrie Mae Weems’ 1995-1996 installation “From Here I Saw What Happened and I Cried” provides an opportunity to meditate on the discourses of woundedness that permeate much thinking on race, affect, and masochism while also allowing us to theorize brown jouissance. Following Lacan, Dr. Musser takes jouissance to be the experience of being a body, “‘something’ lived by a body when pleasure stops being pleasure”. This lecture dwells on jouissance in order to retain the ambivalence of emotion that is provoked by Weems’ invocation of tears. Brown jouissance offers to consider this opacity as strategic, masochistic, and deeply connected to the flesh, and enables a rethinking of the relationship between psychoanalysis, femininity, and race.
Dr. Amber Jamilla Musser is Assistant Professor of Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at Washington University in St. Louis. Her research interests include critical race theory, queer theory, and sexuality studies. Her monograph Sensational Flesh: Race, Power, and Masochism was recently published by NYU Press, and she is currently at work on another project tentatively titled “Brown Jouissance: Feminine Imaginings.”
Interested in attending? 
This lecture is free, but please RSVP to confirm your attendance via EventBrite ( https://www.eventbrite.ca/myevent?eid=33894893539 )
For more information, please visit siss.info.yorku.ca
For the full list of SISS events open to the public, please visit siss.info.yorku.ca/public-events/ (or see the attached poster)
Email us @ siss@yorku.ca
Follow us on Twitter @SISS2017
See the event on Facebook
With support from a SSHRC Connection Grant and York University: Office of the Vice President Academic & Provost; Office of the Vice President Research and Innovation; the Faculty of Education; the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies; the Faculty of Graduate Studies; the Graduate Program in Gender, Feminist and Women’s Studies; the School of Gender, Sexuality and Women’s Studies; Glendon Gender and Women’s Studies Program; the Sexuality Studies Program; Institute for Feminist Legal Studies at Osgoode Hall Law School; Graduate Program in Social and Political Thought; Department of Anthropology; Department of History; Department of Political Science; Department of Social Science; and the Centre for Feminist Research.
Public transit directions to York University are here – http://maps.info.yorku.ca/keele-campus/keele-transit-directions/
The York Keele campus map is here – http://maps.info.yorku.ca/keele-campus/

SISS Lecture, “Race as Kink: Reading Transracial Fetishism” with Dr. Trish Salah

SISS Salah lecture poster
Centre for Feminist Research at York University presents:
Summer Institute in Sexuality Studies (SISS) 2017 
Perversion at the Crossroads of Critical Race Studies, Psychoanalysis, and Queer Theory
 
Race as Kink: Reading Transracial Fetishism
Public Lecture by Dr. Trish Salah
 
Introduced by Dr. John Greyson
10am-11.30am
Tuesday, June 6th, 2017
DB 0014 (Victor Phillip Dahdaleh Building, formerly Technology Enhanced Learning [TEL] Building), York University
In what sense might we speak or think about race as libidinally charged? How do we understand racial identity as erotically invested and in what ways do we see object choice as racially inflected? To what extent are such libidinal economies of identity formation and object choice both ubiquitously alluded to and routinely disavowed? And what are the circumstances under which they present themselves as an occasion for scandal, crisis and conflict?
Drawing upon Freud’s discussion of the place of disavowal in the constitution of desire, this talk is an attempt to think about the persistence, and affective charge, with which analogies between transgender identities and forms of racial passing or cross-identification, increasingly named as “transracialism,” are made.
Dr. Trish Salah is Assistant Professor in the Department of Gender Studies at Queen’s University and the author of two poetry collections, the Lambda award-winning Wanting in Arabic and Lyric Sexology, Vol. 1.
Interested in attending?
This lecture is free, but please RSVP to confirm your attendance via EventBrite ( eventbrite.ca/myevent?eid=33894893539 )
For more information, please visit siss.info.yorku.ca
For the full list of SISS events open to the public, please visit siss.info.yorku.ca/public-events/ (or see the attached poster)
Email us @ siss@yorku.ca
Follow us on Twitter @SISS2017
See the event on Facebook
With support from a SSHRC Connection Grant and York University: Office of the Vice President Academic & Provost; Office of the Vice President Research and Innovation; the Faculty of Education; the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies; the Faculty of Graduate Studies; the Graduate Program in Gender, Feminist and Women’s Studies; the School of Gender, Sexuality and Women’s Studies; Glendon Gender and Women’s Studies Program; the Sexuality Studies Program; Institute for Feminist Legal Studies at Osgoode Hall Law School; Graduate Program in Social and Political Thought; Department of Anthropology; Department of History; Department of Political Science; Department of Social Science; and the Centre for Feminist Research.
Public transit directions to York University are here – http://maps.info.yorku.ca/keele-campus/keele-transit-directions/
The York Keele campus map is here – http://maps.info.yorku.ca/keele-campus/

SISS Lecture, “Pedagogy and The Perverse In Toni Morrison’s God Help The Child” with Dr. Aparna Mishra Tarc

SISS Tarc lecture poster
The Centre for Feminist Research at York University presents:
Summer Institute in Sexuality Studies (SISS) 2017 
Perversion at the Crossroads of Critical Race Studies, Psychoanalysis, and Queer Theory
 
Pedagogy and The Perverse In Toni Morrison’s God Help The Child
Public Lecture by Dr. Aparna Mishra Tarc
Introduced by Toby Wiggins
Monday, June 5, 2017
12-1.30pm 
519 Kaneff, York University
Aligned with queer scholarship recuperating perversion from its pathological treatment in the social sciences, Dr. Aparna Mishra Tarc theorizes the perverse in a turn to Melanie Klein’s treatment of Freud’s polymorphous perverse baby subject to the adult (m)other’s sexual drives. This lecture will examine how infantile sexuality is expressed and repressed in sexual and racial markers of identity through a psychoanalytic reading of Toni Morrison’s God Help the Child. Dr. Mishra Tarc will discuss how Morrison’s novel investigates personal, legal and societal responses to perverse expressions of the child’s sexuality generating, degenerating and regenerating the self. Subject to the other with sexual drives of their own, this text highlights the profound role of pedagogy in the care of the child’s polymorphous perverse existence.
Dr. Aparna Mishra Tarc is Associate Professor at the Faculty of Education at York University. Her scholarship examines the dynamic place of pedagogy in the ongoing subject formation of person. She is the author of Literacy of the Other: Renarrating Humanity (SUNY Press) and is currently working on the book Pedagogy in the Novels of J.M. Coetzee (Routledge).
Interested in attending? 
This lecture is free, but please RSVP to confirm your attendance via EventBrite ( https://www.eventbrite.ca/myevent?eid=33894893539 )
For more information, please visit siss.info.yorku.ca
For the full list of SISS events open to the public, please visit siss.info.yorku.ca/public-events/ (or see the attached schedule poster)
Email us @ siss@yorku.ca
Follow us on Twitter @SISS2017 
See the event on Facebook
With support from a SSHRC Connection Grant and York University: Office of the Vice President Academic & Provost; Office of the Vice President Research and Innovation; the Faculty of Education; the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies; the Faculty of Graduate Studies; the Graduate Program in Gender, Feminist and Women’s Studies; the School of Gender, Sexuality and Women’s Studies; Glendon Gender and Women’s Studies Program; the Sexuality Studies Program; Institute for Feminist Legal Studies at Osgoode Hall Law School; Graduate Program in Social and Political Thought; Department of Anthropology; Department of History; Department of Political Science; Department of Social Science; and the Centre for Feminist Research.
Public transit directions to York University are here – maps.info.yorku.ca/keele-campus/keele-transit-directions/
The York Keele campus map is here – maps.info.yorku.ca/keele-campus/

Disruptive Erotics in Psychoanalytic Time at Ryerson University

 

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Disruptive Erotics in Psychoanalytic Time 
Ryerson University Toronto, Saturday May 27th from 2:30 – 3:45

Chair: Tobias B. D. Wiggins

Panel Description

Psychoanalysis has been widely critiqued for developmental rigidity, yet it provides surprisingly rich frameworks for queering normative chronologies. The timelessness of the Freudian drives, repetitions as a form of unconscious memory, the psychical remnants of childhood, uncanny encounters, the “après-coup” of trauma, lingering perversities, and the intermediacy of ambivalence, all disrupt knowable and reliable futurities. This proposed panel will thus employ a variety of psychoanalytic theory—including Freudian, Lacanian, Kleinian thought—to consider novel queer forms of disruptive erotics in psychoanalytic time. Drawing from diverse locations in sex studies, such as pornography, psychodynamic practice, anti-colonial sci-fi narratives, sex work/sexual labour, the “transsexual pervert,” and the corporeal, we collectively consider what psychoanalysis can teach us about sex, temporality, and love. The panelists approach these topics beyond a monolithic academic standpoint—many of them are community-based scholars, clinicians, and activists, particularly in the field of mental health. Combining clinical experience with scholarly work allows for a unique perspective that reaches beyond the theoretical, and should be a valuable contribution to the SSA’s annual meeting at this year’s Congress.

Papers:

Psychoanalysis and the Transsexual Pervert’s Queer Time 
Tobias B. D. Wiggins

 “Ties of Blood and Water”: Race, Sex, and Reparation in “Star Trek: Deep Space Nine”
David K. Seitz

Sex/work
Ricky Varghese

Perverse Speech in Talk Therapy School
Beau Molnar 

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for more information on Congress 2017, http://www.congress2017.ca